Lingo

As you may have noticed sometimes there are words on my blog that aren’t strictly English. So here’s the 411 for you non-native yiddish/hebrew speakers.

1) Bruria – kickass rabbi’s wife from 2,000 years ago. See more here

2)  Balabusta – totally in control housewife who can leap over burning buildings while making chicken soup. See more here.

3) Shalom – Means hello and goodbye in Hebrew. It also means peace.

4) Shabbat – Friday night and Saturday until evening. Sometimes referred to as shabz. Shabbat dinner is sometimes referred to as shabz dinz. For an inaccurate definition see this. 

5) Tanaaim – Jewish thinkers in Israel/Palestine about 2,000 years ago. Singular: Tanna. In this context, I’m using it as a friendly greeting – like “hey brothers and sisters” – for more details see this.

6) Talmud – potentially the most significant document to rabbinic judaism. It’s a collection of texts with discussions recorded regarding all matters of life; tort law, stories, relationships and morality. for an innacurate despription see this, for a more accurate one see this.

7)Ta Shema – a term used in the Talmud (see above) meaning ‘come and hear’

8) Tanna Kamma – The anonymous first tanna (see above) who is frequently quoted in or attributed to mishnaic texts. Also refers to Talmud’s (the sometimes poster on this blog) husband.

9) Shavua Tov – Hebrew for have a good week, said on Saturday nights and Sundays since Saturdays are the last day of the Jewish week. More info see this.

10) Gut Vuch – Yiddish for have a good week. See above for when to use this greeting. For information about Yiddish see this and this. 

11) Rosh HaShana – Jewish New Years according to the Hebrew Calender. Normally falls in September. See this.

12) Kreplach – Dumpling filled with meat or vegetables, eaten in soup. See this.

13) Shana Tova – ‘Have a good new years’ in Hebrew. The greeting on Jewish New Years (see number 11)

I suppose as this blog progresses we’ll add more words to my little mini-dictionary!

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